Archive for Sports Medicine

The Sports Medicine Fellowship at SVSP

St. Vincent Sports Performance is already known as a destination for athletes who desire an all-encompassing approach to their sport participation needs. The sum of the parts, including sports medicine, sports rehabilitation, sports nutrition, sport psychology and performance training, is greater than adding each of these alone.

Having these aspects of sports performance housed under one roof makes SVSP an ideal location for training other performance specialists. Sports Medicine has been recognized as a medical specialty for over 20 years. Training to become a sports medicine physician requires a one-year fellowship in an accredited program after completion of residency as well as board certification. St. Vincent Sports Performance received accreditation for its fellowship in 2012. Since then we have trained five sports medicine physicians and a sixth is currently in the program. All five prior fellowship graduates have obtained board certification in sports medicine on their first attempt.

During the one year of training, our sports medicine fellow is part of the team. Finding the right fit for the team is crucial to a successful fellowship program. When selecting applicants to interview, we assess several factors. The most crucial of these is demonstrating a desire to be involved with sports and active individuals. This can include assisting with a local high school in providing medical coverage or volunteering medical services at mass participation events such as a marathon or triathlon. Other factors that go into selecting candidates include rotating in sports medicine electives, attendance of sports medicine conferences, scholarly activity that is relevant to sports medicine and performance on medical board exams.

Training an outstanding sports medicine physician is an easier task when that physician wants to be part of the program. Fellows are selected through the National Residency Matching Program (NRMP). Each year, we interview about 10 candidates for one fellowship position. Those candidates will also interview at other programs across the country. The candidates then submit a ranking list of their programs to the NRMP and the fellowship programs do the same for their list of candidates. The NRMP then integrates those lists so that each candidate and each program will get the highest ranked match available. Not all candidates match to a program and not all programs match a candidate. SVSP’s fellowship program has successfully matched all six years.

Once the match process is complete, the task of educating the fellow falls on all of us at SVSP. We are blessed to have an outstanding network of providers within our walls and some outside our walls to take on the task of educating the fellow. Our sports medicine physicians train the fellow in diagnosis and management of sport-related conditions. Our sports rehabilitation team educate the fellow on rehabilitation principles as they relate to sport. SVSP sports dieticians and sport psychologists also educate the fellow on their areas of unique expertise and how to best utilize their services.

Education also occurs outside the walls of SVSP including orthopedic clinics, radiology centers, sidelines and training rooms. The fellow will also function in the role of a team physician. The primary opportunities exist working with Marian University, Butler University and a local high school. Teaching and scholarly activity is also an expected component of the fellowship. The fellow will have the opportunity to teach residents, medical students and other post-graduate students. Scholarly activity may include original research, review articles, textbook chapters, peer-reviewed journal authorship or in-depth case presentation.

At SVSP, training a sports medicine fellow is a rewarding experience. It is an opportunity to give back to a field that has given us so much in our lives. We all had our own mentors and advisors we looked up to and this is an opportunity to pay that back. In addition, training medical professionals is a way for SVSP to give back to our community locally and across the state or beyond. Our fellows may stay and practice locally, may practice in other parts of the state, or travel to other states. Regardless, a well-trained sports medicine physician can be a valuable asset to any area or community and we are happy to help in this manner. So, in addition to our primary areas of service, medical education is another way SVSP is Defining Sports Performance.

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On The Road With USA Football Pt. 2

After arriving at Trinity Western University in Langley, British Columbia, Canada last Thursday, this past week has been a whirlwind.  The first step was to unload all of our supplies and get the new “training room” set up.  This in itself is no small feat, as football requires much more athletic training supplies than nearly any other sport.  While a dorm room doesn’t make an ideal training room, Sarah and I have been able to transform it into a functional space to tape and treat, and have done a lot of both!

When it was announced that this tournament was going to be held in Canada, I thought we wouldn’t have to deal with any heat issues.  The average high for Langley this time of year is 71 degrees.  Of course, we experienced a heat wave of record highs, and temperatures on game day soared to around 90 degrees.  Thankfully, the ladies did a great job of hydrating and taking our advice leading up to the game and we were able to come away without any issues.  After a bit of a slow start, we were able to get things clicking and came out with a 29-0 victory over a very athletic Mexico team.

After two busy days of practice, treatments and recovery time, team Finland was next.  Thankfully, the heat wave broke and temperatures were back to normal.  With the nervousness of the first game behind them, the ladies came out and played well, securing a 48-0 win.  The victory puts us in the Gold Medal Game against our biggest rival and Tournament host, Canada.

Already you can feel a new tension in the air as we prepare for the championship game.  Team Canada has played well in their wins over Australia and Great Britain.  Sarah and I are doing our best to keep the training room light and relaxed, giving the players a refuge from the tension of meetings and practice.  Thankfully, injuries have been minimal.  Only one player was held from practice today.  Treatments have consisted mainly of massage, stretching, cupping, and everyone’s favorite, the ice tubs.  Our little courtyard at the dorm has a fire pit, which has made a nice addition to evening ice baths, and made for some good team bonding time.  It’s funny how each of these trips take on their own personality.

Friday evening we will have the opportunity to accomplish our goal of bringing home the Gold.  The coaches will put together a great game plan, Sarah and I will continue to do everything we can to help the ladies compete at their highest level, and I’m sure they will leave everything they have out on the field.  Hopefully it will be enough.

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SVSP Back on the Road With USA Football

Each summer one of USA Football’s national teams participates in the International Federation of American Football (IFAF) World Championships and each year St. Vincent Sports Performance is right there providing premier medical support along the way.  Last year, Chad Gabbard and I traveled to Harbin, China, with the U19 national team. This year, it’s the women’s national team on their quest for gold.

Sarah Luken and myself have spent the past week at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, Washington, working with the team through training camp.  As it is every year, it’s been amazing to watch how quickly individuals from all over the country come together as a team in such a short time.  In my opinion, football is the ultimate team sport, and with the bond this team has forged so quickly, the U.S. is well on their way to another solid performance.

This squad of 45 women represent 15 different states, and ranges in age from 21 to 47 years old.  One thing that makes working with the women’s national team a bit more challenging is the fact that nearly all of the players have just finished up their regular season back home or are in the middle of their playoffs.  In fact, about half of the team reported to camp the day after they just played a game.  This adds to an already delicate balance of getting in the practice time we need, along with making sure they have time to rest and recover before we head to Canada and play three games in eight days.

Needless to say, the training room has been a popular place.  When not on the field, in meetings, or at meals, chances are you’ll find Luken and I in there doing everything we can to help these ladies stay healthy and able to perform their best.

Today is our last day of camp.  We’ll finish with an “ice tub party,” get all our supplies packed back up, and get ready to head north of the border tomorrow morning.  Saturday afternoon we open up against Mexico.

Stay tuned.

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Dr. Arnold On the Road With USATF; Part 3

Last weekend the SVSP crew traveled to New York City for the 110th running of the historic Millrose Games. The event was filled with another list of great American athletes, many coming off a successful Rio 2016.

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The week had challenges waiting for us right away because of the weather. Ten inches of New York snow threw a wrench into our travel plans. After a few re-routed flights and a medical emergency at baggage claim prevented taxis from getting to the pick-up zone, I was finally able to catch a ride and head to the venue. Other athletes weren’t so lucky, like Brenda Martinez, who was scheduled to compete in the 800 but was forced to turn around on her flight to NY.

After all of that I was quite tired and it made me wonder how the athletes deal with these types of distractions. How do they focus? Most people that travel frequently deal with these things all the time. For athletes it is no different, and there are potential distractions everywhere. Late arrivals, fans seeking autographs, no space to warm up, or a forgotten item actually happen to world class athletes.

Leah O'Connor

Leah O’Connor

At this meet I had the opportunity to reconnect with Indiana’s own Waverly Neer, who has recently transitioned into a professional runner. This was special for me as I have cared for her since high school and followed her career through many steps. Having access to her I asked her a couple of questions about her transition into professional running and where she draws her motivation. I also asked her how she finds focus:

What motivates me? I’m motivated by a variety of things in this sport. While I’m no longer running to score points for a team or chasing championships, in a real sense, I still have teammates in my new training partners. I’m motivated by their strengths; which sometimes are my weaknesses. Seeing them excel in a certain workout or a race shows me that things I personally find difficult can be done, and done well. At the same time, I’m motivated to give my best effort during workouts for my teammates because I want to be a positive contributor. And on top of all of that, I’m motivated by other runners and the high level, exceptional performances that pop up throughout the season. Things recently that stick out to me are Abbey D’Agostino’s story over the Olympics, Evan Jager taking home the silver, and any time Ajee Wilson races. I’m inspired by the people who are moving the sport forward, because at the end of the day they are human beings that work hard to relentlessly pursue their dreams. For me that’s relatable, and entirely motivating. 

 How do I focus? I think this is an evolving process for the sheer fact that life circumstances are constantly changing. Whether it’s big (moving to a new location to train), or in comparison small (it’s windy or cold the day of a big workout), as athletes we constantly have to frame and reframe our mindset to meet the demands of a workout, a race, and even life. I find what works best for me is to focus on the things I can control, and that usually boils down to just my attitude and my effort. Rather than dwelling on the negative things that pop up, or the “distractions” around me, I try to channel my energy towards creating a positive mindset and putting forth my honest best effort that day. I’ve found when I do that I’m best able to zero in on the one thing I’m really seeking to accomplish, and that’s to be a happy, healthy, speedy runner.

Find your way to focus. You will certainly have something distract you. Find something that helps you forget the issue. This applies to race day of course but I believe it also applies to training. Training with something bothering you may be limiting you from tapping into your potential. Turn the distraction off, work on the training, not the problem.

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Dr. Todd Arnold On the Road With USATF; Part 2

New Balance Indoor Grand Prix 2017

A world record in Boston. Emma Coburn, Sydney McLaughlin, Brenda Martinez and Jenny Simpson passed the baton for 20 laps of the 200-meter track in world record time. They posted a time of 10:40.31, just under the previous world record. With each pass of the baton the crowd cheered louder and greeted Jenny with loud roars as she raced for the line. It was a great atmosphere!

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The day before the race I had the chance to talk with Jenny Simpson while she was preparing for the event. Last year at this time she was just beginning to train after dealing with an injury. This year is different, and she was anticipating the chance to turn on the jets during the last leg of their race. She stated something that I found very interesting.

She said that she was recently discussing goals with her coaches, with a focus on her strengths and weaknesses. Weaknesses? She won an Olympic medal last year after injuring herself during training only months before. Now she is completely healthy and strong, and is looking for weaknesses? I was baffled. But clearly she feels that there are things to work on. The body needs to be challenged.

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The lesson here is: there is always something that can be improved, even if you just won a medal for being the greatest. Jenny also shed some light on why I do what I do. Improving athletes’ weaknesses is what my profession does. Finding something so tiny in movement or joint mobility and correcting it can make all the difference needed to succeed at the highest level. Looking for those weaknesses has become the focus of what I do.

This meet had a high volume of great athletes that we cared for. Please continue to seek them out on social media and show them your support. They are all great athletes, and their athletic accomplishments may not be the only activity that inspires you to discover and attack both your strengths and your weaknesses.

Emma CoburnSydney McLaughlinBrenda Martinez | Jenny SimpsonJeff Henderson

Shannon RowburyPaul ChelimoNoah LylesVernon NorwoodEnglish Gardner

Courtney OkoloJessica BeardAutumne FranklinStephanie GarciaLeah O’ConnorJenn Suhr

Mary Saxer

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Dr. Todd Arnold On the Road With USATF; Part 1

As the calendar turns to the new year, the 2016 Rio Olympics are behind us. The games brought USA Track and Field 32 medals, the highest since 1932 (excluding the boycotted games in Los Angeles) and St. Vincent Sports Performance had direct connection to 27 of them. 2017 looks to have that continued success.

One of the first trips of the year has us in Texas to work with Darrel Woodson (D2) and his group of sprinters. This week it’s in the high 30s, but the commitment is made and the athletes are out and working. We assess movement patterns, strength and symmetry and connect these to their events. The start of the season is a very valuable time for us. If dysfunction is ignored now and fitness is applied over that dysfunction, the risk of injury is higher and performance can be limited. No one wants to limit their potential!

Assessments are no fun in the cold. This is a picture of Sharika Nelvis beginning her Functional Movement Screen in her winter gear:

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Sharika competes in the 100m hurdles, arguably the most competitive event in American track and field. At last year’s Olympic trials, she finished fourth, just missing the team. But Sharika and D2 are focused on 2017, not the past. On this assessment she looks great, moves well and is ready to put in the work to compete. We often tell athletes that when they look good on the movement assessment that it’s the time to work. Be comfortable trying something new. Let the body that moves well adapt to something new and see how it impacts performance.

This trip was pretty unique as we took the roadshow to multiple cities and had the privilege of seeing athletes from multiple disciplines. We started in Texas and Los Angeles with sprinters and hurdlers, moved to Reno to see the pole vaulters, onto Chula Vista at the Olympic Training Center for throwers and jumpers, finally ending in Orlando with Lance Brauman and his group of sprinters.

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Please seek out the athletes we saw on this last trip via their social media and show them your support as they attack 2017 with their focus on competing in the many events leading up to the World Championships in London August 3-13.

Sharika NelvisMookie SalaamDiondre BatsonBryce RobinsonAshley Spencer

Morolake AkinosunCourtney Ovolo | Brianna RollinsDalilah MuhammadNia Ali

Dawn HarperCale SimmonsJacob BlankenshipKatie NageotteLogan Cunningham

Kylie HutsonSandi MorrisMary SaxerMike Arnold | Dani BunchJarvis Gotch

Amanda BingsonDeanna PriceMaggie Malone | Curtis Thompson | Felisha Johnson

Amber CampbellAndrea GuebelleMichelle CarterKelsey CardOctavious Freeman

Noah LylesJosephus Lyles

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Walk-in Clinics

Injured from physical activity or organized sports? Injuries happen and most don’t need ER care. St. Vincent Sports Performance clinics are available for anyone. See us today and get back out there!

Here’s what you need to know:

Saturday Clinics
WHERE: SVSP Clay Terrace and Fishers
WHEN: 8:00am-10:00am

*Weekday Walk-In Clinics
WHERE: All Three SVSP Physician locations (Fishers, Clay Terrace and Northwest)
WHEN: 8:00am-10:00am

*Walk-in clinics are for acute injuries ONLY. Chronic issues should schedule an appointment: call us at 317-415-5795.

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The Thrill of the Victory and the Agony of Defeat

I’m sure that many of you can recall watching the introduction to ABC’s The Wild World of Sports and hearing Jim McKay say,” The thrill of victory and the agony of defeat”. This past week I had the privilege of working with a number of USA Track and Field athletes as they pursued their dream of making this year’s Olympic Team.

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I saw the thrill of victory when the world’s best times were posted by LaShawn Merritt and English Gardner. I witnessed the thrill of seeing Trayvon Bromell, Sandi Morris, Emily Infeld and Colleen Quigley overcome injury to make the Olympic Team.

I saw the agony of defeat when Molly Ludlow, Leah O’Connor and Georganne Moline had to deal with circumstances out of there control and were unable to make the team. Everyone felt an overwhelming sense of sadness and gratitude when track and field icons Sanya Richards Ross, Dee Dee Trotter and Adam Nelson failed to make the Olympic Team and announced their retirement. We will always remember their influences in the sport we love.

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Americans love watching and participating in sports for the thrill we get when we are victorious. We keep coming back when we experience the agony of defeat. I feel very honored and blessed to assist athletes as they strive to reach their goals and feel the thrill of their accomplishments.

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Payton Jordan Invitational

Darrell Barnes and I had the opportunity to travel again for USA Track and Field this weekend, attending the historic Payton Jordan Invitational hosted by Stanford University.Each year elite distance runners converge on Palo Alto to take advantage of near perfect running conditions.  Many come here chasing the standard, trying to get an entry into that years qualifying or championship meets.  This year’s event educated me in a unique way, and I continue to learn about the care elite athletes require in their pursuit of success.

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Runners race for a variety of reasons, and the 2016 Payton Jordan Invitational found many runners racing in events that are not their specialty.  Some were using it as a challenging workout while others were working on racing strategies.

 

Many athletes felt that they had not performed up to their expectations, however a common response was not that of disappointment or frustration, but of recognition that this is part of the process.  This is not the goal, but one step of many toward the end result.  Initially my response was one of disappointment for them.  I am used to seeing these athletes, some of them the best in the world, win every event I witness.  But talking to them after the event opened my eyes to the humility they possess, recognizing that this day is but one small part in the process.  In the grand scheme they might not win every race, but they experienced something this weekend that will help them win THE race.

 

For young and developing athletes I feel this is a lesson to heed.  There will be moments in training and competing that don’t feel like improvements.  These moments are important, however.  Each is part of the larger process, part of the completion of the larger goal.  These moments can come in the form of injuries that require large amounts of time off, workouts that inflict pain, or races that fall short of the desired result.

 

This weekend we heard several explanations as to why performances on didn’t look good on paper, but the common theme was a humble respect for the process.  Respect for the plan their coach has outlined.  Respect for the steps it takes to be truly great at something.  Respect for competitors; something we can all learn from.

 

The Olympic Games are less than 100 days away.  Please support these athletes as they pursue glory and gold in 2016.

Bowerman Track Club | Dan Huling | Chris Derrick | Evan Jager | Lopez Lomong |

Shelby Houlihan | Andy Bayer (Indiana native) | German Fernandez | Colleen Quigley |

Emily Infeld | Amy Cragg | Shalane Flanagan | Ryan Hill | Laura Roesler | Dana Mecke |

Kendra Chambers | Jesse Jorgensen

 

 

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Dr. Arnold from the West Coast

St. Vincent Sports Performance is partnered with several National Governing Bodies including USA Track and Field. Dr. Todd Arnold of SVSP is a performance scientist for USATF, helping its athletes prep for major national and international events. Here’s a dispatch from Dr. Arnold’s travels.

We had a few weeks at home, but the road to Rio calls again! This past week, the SVSP team traveled to California and Phoenix. Our athletes are really ramping up their training and are starting to get worn out.  Some competed for the USA Indoor Championships and those that advanced competed just one short week later.

It was such a pleasure to see and evaluate Brianna Rollins. At 24, her performance is already promising; Brianna is coming off a second place finish at the World Indoor Championships in the 60m hurdles. As of this year, she also holds the world’s best time for the 60m hurdles. She is a joy to work with and takes great care of her body. Out of curiosity, I asked her what advice she would give her younger self if she had the chance. Without hesitation, she said “to believe in yourself, always.” She was emphatic, but thoughtful as she spoke.  She exuded confidence in herself and what she had said; she had no doubts.

Brianna Rollins

Athletes to Watch:

400m runners, Kind Butler and Bryshon Nellum, are two athletes to look for in 2016.  Kind is from Indiana but now trains in LA. Cali native Bryshon, was horrifically shot early in his collegiate career. At the time, the doctors weren’t sure if he would ever be able to compete at a high level again. Fortunately, he made an amazing recovery and now participates at the highest level of competition. Please follow and support both these athletes as they make a run towards the USA Olympic Trials, in hopes of representing the US.

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