Archive for High School Sports

2017 Summer Training Schedule

Register today for any of these programs and make 2017 the best summer ever with SVSP!

Leave a Comment

Brain power: tips to mentally prepare for competition

Great athletes put in hours practicing, eating right, and sleeping for success. The best athletes, however, also spend adequate time harnessing the power of their minds. Sports go beyond physical capabilities, and often wins and losses can be traced to mental strength. Here are some tips from our very own Dr. Chris Carr regarding mental preparation:

  1. Begin your imagery of competition the night before; visualize success, great plays and victory.
  2. Focus on deep breathing during the ride to the event.
  3. Use music to focus and visualize making great plays.
  4. Keep your thoughts on the present…one play at a time.
  5. When you have distractions in your mind, create some type of release by visualizing yourself destroying those distractions.
  6. Write down a cue word that you associate with your own optimal performance and have it on your wrist or someplace easily accessible for reminders.
  7. Use the same routine before every game or competition.
  8. Love the game and enjoy playing.

Leave a Comment

Travel Blog: USA Football in Florida; Part 2

Thursday January 26th

Taping and treatments started at 7am. Our last padded practice was this morning. The coaches and athletes are getting so excited for this game. Practice ends and we head back to the hotel for lunch and some down time before treatments starts. Our second practice is a helmet only practice to allow the boys to focus on attention to detail. The day ends at 9pm.

Friday January 27th

Last practice before the big game with Canada. The motto all week has been “Let’s go 1-0.”  Taping and treatments start at 7am. We are really healthy right now and the boys have really listened to what I have told them to do and have followed my instructions very well. We have a great group of kids and coaches. Our last practice of the day gives the boys an opportunity to hear from a four star general about football. It’s amazing how much patriotism you have when you have the USA logo on the front of your chest. The day ends and we do some final treatments and get the boys to bed for some rest.

IMG_3061

Saturday January 28th

Game day!!! The guys get a chance to sleep in today. We meet as a team at 9am to have breakfast and talk about the day. My day is filled with last minute treatments before we start taping at 2pm for our game. We head to the field for our game at 5:30pm. Final stretching and taping and the boys are ready to go. What a game for Team USA! We score in the first 10 seconds and that sets the tone for the game. The defense plays unbelievably and keep Canada from scoring. This is the first time the U18 USA team has beaten Canada. As we end the game, it’s a time to thank everyone and make sure everyone is safe for the trip home. What another great week with SVSP and USA Football!

IMG_3059

Leave a Comment

How Much Protein Do You Need?

Walk down almost any isle in the grocery store and you’ll see bold or italic letters on products with a common word: protein. Products want you to know that their stuff has more of it now, whether it’s 10 grams, 12 grams, or 20 grams per serving. So, how much do you actually need? Before that question is answered, let’s talk about the benefits of protein.

img_4691

Why You Need It

Protein not only produces energy, but it builds and maintains muscle mass as well. Getting adequate protein on a daily basis is a must if you’re trying to build muscle or actively trying to burn fat. Protein also reduces the excess carbohydrates that we take in with processed foods. Protein packs a punch, so make sure you’re getting enough.

How Much You Need

As great as protein is, your body can only absorb a certain amount for proper use. The maximum amount of protein you can consume daily is around one gram per pound of body weight. If you weigh 160 pounds, that’s 160 grams per day.

img_5015

The best way to consume protein is in smaller, more frequent ways throughout your day. Getting 20-40 grams five or six times during your day is better than gorging yourself for dinner. In fact, breakfast and bedtime are crucial times to get protein in your system. Whether it’s a shake or snack, lean protein in the morning and before bed go a long way in building and maintaining muscle mass.

 

Leave a Comment

The AGE Old Question

At what age can athletes begin strength training? The answer is slightly more complex than just assigning a number. Every person is different when it comes to development, and every person is different when it comes to strength.

fitness-594143_1920

What is strength training?

Strength training boils down to moving your body. Lifting weights is strength training, but the foundation of every athlete is sound movement. That being said, athletes can start developing good movement habits as young as 4th or 5th grade without ever touching weights. Learning how to properly move the body in space is far more important than lifting weights at any age.

Weight and resistance training

Once the athlete establishes good movement patterns, they can begin weight and resistance training as they physically mature. For an athlete starting out, lighter is always better and the focus should be on the quality of the movement rather than the quantity of weight. You will build more strength doing a squat properly with no weight than poorly with 200 pounds. Injuries can occur easily with heavy weight so understanding that quality is more important than quantity is crucial.

kettlebells-1677217_1920

Most high school athletes are expected to know how to use weight training on some level. In order to gain strength, understanding that movement is the foundation will go a long way to ensuring safety and growth for your young athlete.

 

Leave a Comment

How to Achieve Your Goals

Whether you’re going for a gold medal, state championship or you just want to lose those last 10 pounds, you need a healthy set of goals to get there. It’s relatively easy to set them, but achieving them is a whole different monster.

Napoleon Bonaparte said, “The reason most people fail is they trade what they want most for what they want at the moment.” So how do you achieve what you want most? By understanding the difference between outcome and process goals.

archery-472932_1920

Outcome goals are pretty straightforward: they’re the endgame. They’re the goals listed in the first sentence. Improving your record time, running a half-marathon, becoming an All-American. Those are outcome goals. That is what you want most, and it’s easy to set those without a plan in place. Enter process goals.

Process goals are what you need to do on a daily basis to accomplish your outcome goals. Getting up early to run, eating a salad instead of pizza, doing an extra set of push-ups, spending an extra hour after practice shooting. Those are process goals, and those are the goals that often get brushed aside. Those are the goals we fail to accomplish when we fall into the trap Napoleon talked about. The more we focus on process goals, however, the better chance we have of accomplishing our outcome goals.

running-1705716_1280

There’s one more thing to understand before setting out to conquer your goals: motivation. The best and most durable motivation is internal. This comes from within you and fuels the drive you need to accomplish your process goals. Being the best version of yourself, being better than yesterday, getting to another level on the playing field. Those are internal motivators. Wanting your name in the paper, looking like a million bucks, winning that coveted award. Those are external motivators. Sure, motivation comes from those things as well, but only the fire from internal motivation lasts when you don’t want to get out of bed.

Shift your motivation internally, attack your daily process goals and watch your outcome goals get closer and closer to reality.

Leave a Comment

Walk-in Clinics

Injured from physical activity or organized sports? Injuries happen and most don’t need ER care. St. Vincent Sports Performance clinics are available for anyone. See us today and get back out there!

Here’s what you need to know:

Saturday Clinics
WHERE: SVSP Clay Terrace and Fishers
WHEN: 8:00am-10:00am

*Weekday Walk-In Clinics
WHERE: All Three SVSP Physician locations (Fishers, Clay Terrace and Northwest)
WHEN: 8:00am-10:00am

*Walk-in clinics are for acute injuries ONLY. Chronic issues should schedule an appointment: call us at 317-415-5795.

Leave a Comment

SVSP Strength and Conditioning Coaches

Have you met our strength and conditioning staff? Our coaches have the experience and expertise to take your performance to the next level. Wherever you are in your journey, they will help you maximize your potential on the field of play. Our coaches give you the same tools and attention that professional athletes receive. What are you waiting for?

Brandon Johnson

 

Greg Moore

 

Jaime Waymouth

 

Emily Burgess

 

David Williams

 

Stephanie Young

 

Jeff Richter

Comments (1)

Superstitious Young Athletes

Lucky socks, tying your shoes a certain way, stepping over the foul line, putting your gloves on left hand first, then right hand, rally caps… Superstitions abound among young athletes. Are they good? Are they bad? What can a parent do to help a child with useful pre-performance routines? Kacey Oiness, Ph.D., HSPP, a Sport & Performance Psychologist at St.Vincent Sports Performance is here to answer those questions and more.



Kids often develop superstitions in an effort to create consistency in performances and feel as though there is something they can control each time they compete. Therefore, encouraging kids to develop performance routines can be useful, as it can allow them to identify things that are within their control that can contribute to success. You can assist your child in creating pre-performance routines that contribute to performance such as healthy behaviors (i.e. a good night’s sleep, eating healthy, etc.), as well as incorporating mental skills that lead to greater levels of confidence and an ability to maintain composure (i.e. positive self-talk, relaxation strategies, visualization). By encouraging them to develop a routine that facilitates their performance, you are giving them a way to feel a sense of control and consistency, without necessarily having to turn to superstitions.

football snap

Superstitions, however, can be a part of sport and are not necessarily bad. But it is important to be cautious about allowing an athlete to depend  on their superstitious behaviors. Flexibility is key: if an athlete is unable to perform an aspect of their performance routine or engage in a superstitious behavior, it is important for them to learn to refocus on things that are within their control moving forward. When an athlete has difficulty moving past the idea that they have to engage in a superstitious behavior, that is when it can become harmful. The more you can assist your athlete in developing useful physical and mental performance routines and reinforce flexibility in that routine, the more beneficial it will be to their athletic performance.

Leave a Comment

Introducing Dr. Ordaz

Dan Ordaz3-sm

 

Dr. Dan Ordaz was recently named team physician for Heritage Christian High School, a St.Vincent Sports Performance partner school.

Originally from Ohio, he is a graduate of the St.Vincent Family Medicine Residency and St.Vincent Sports Performance Primary Care Sports Medicine Fellowship.

Dr. Ordaz’s training in sports medicine included coverage of the Butler University and Marian University athletic departments. He also covered several sports as a team physician for Pike and Roncalli High Schools.  Dr. Ordaz annually provides coverage for major running events including the Carmel Marathon and the Geist half-marathon. In addition, he has covered Big 10 men’s and women’s basketball tournaments, Big 10 Football Championship games and multiple USA Track and Field events.

Dr. Ordaz has a special interest in helping athletes of all sports and levels. An avid runner and endurance athlete, he particularly enjoys the evaluation and management of running injuries.

Dr. Ordaz is board certified in both Family Medicine and Sports Medicine. He is a member of several national organizations including the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine and the American College of Sports Medicine. He enjoys spending time with his wife, running, watching movies and various sports.

Leave a Comment