Archive for Endurance Sports

2017 Summer Training Schedule

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Dr. Arnold On the Road With USATF; Part 3

Last weekend the SVSP crew traveled to New York City for the 110th running of the historic Millrose Games. The event was filled with another list of great American athletes, many coming off a successful Rio 2016.

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The week had challenges waiting for us right away because of the weather. Ten inches of New York snow threw a wrench into our travel plans. After a few re-routed flights and a medical emergency at baggage claim prevented taxis from getting to the pick-up zone, I was finally able to catch a ride and head to the venue. Other athletes weren’t so lucky, like Brenda Martinez, who was scheduled to compete in the 800 but was forced to turn around on her flight to NY.

After all of that I was quite tired and it made me wonder how the athletes deal with these types of distractions. How do they focus? Most people that travel frequently deal with these things all the time. For athletes it is no different, and there are potential distractions everywhere. Late arrivals, fans seeking autographs, no space to warm up, or a forgotten item actually happen to world class athletes.

Leah O'Connor

Leah O’Connor

At this meet I had the opportunity to reconnect with Indiana’s own Waverly Neer, who has recently transitioned into a professional runner. This was special for me as I have cared for her since high school and followed her career through many steps. Having access to her I asked her a couple of questions about her transition into professional running and where she draws her motivation. I also asked her how she finds focus:

What motivates me? I’m motivated by a variety of things in this sport. While I’m no longer running to score points for a team or chasing championships, in a real sense, I still have teammates in my new training partners. I’m motivated by their strengths; which sometimes are my weaknesses. Seeing them excel in a certain workout or a race shows me that things I personally find difficult can be done, and done well. At the same time, I’m motivated to give my best effort during workouts for my teammates because I want to be a positive contributor. And on top of all of that, I’m motivated by other runners and the high level, exceptional performances that pop up throughout the season. Things recently that stick out to me are Abbey D’Agostino’s story over the Olympics, Evan Jager taking home the silver, and any time Ajee Wilson races. I’m inspired by the people who are moving the sport forward, because at the end of the day they are human beings that work hard to relentlessly pursue their dreams. For me that’s relatable, and entirely motivating. 

 How do I focus? I think this is an evolving process for the sheer fact that life circumstances are constantly changing. Whether it’s big (moving to a new location to train), or in comparison small (it’s windy or cold the day of a big workout), as athletes we constantly have to frame and reframe our mindset to meet the demands of a workout, a race, and even life. I find what works best for me is to focus on the things I can control, and that usually boils down to just my attitude and my effort. Rather than dwelling on the negative things that pop up, or the “distractions” around me, I try to channel my energy towards creating a positive mindset and putting forth my honest best effort that day. I’ve found when I do that I’m best able to zero in on the one thing I’m really seeking to accomplish, and that’s to be a happy, healthy, speedy runner.

Find your way to focus. You will certainly have something distract you. Find something that helps you forget the issue. This applies to race day of course but I believe it also applies to training. Training with something bothering you may be limiting you from tapping into your potential. Turn the distraction off, work on the training, not the problem.

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Dr. Todd Arnold On the Road With USATF; Part 1

As the calendar turns to the new year, the 2016 Rio Olympics are behind us. The games brought USA Track and Field 32 medals, the highest since 1932 (excluding the boycotted games in Los Angeles) and St. Vincent Sports Performance had direct connection to 27 of them. 2017 looks to have that continued success.

One of the first trips of the year has us in Texas to work with Darrel Woodson (D2) and his group of sprinters. This week it’s in the high 30s, but the commitment is made and the athletes are out and working. We assess movement patterns, strength and symmetry and connect these to their events. The start of the season is a very valuable time for us. If dysfunction is ignored now and fitness is applied over that dysfunction, the risk of injury is higher and performance can be limited. No one wants to limit their potential!

Assessments are no fun in the cold. This is a picture of Sharika Nelvis beginning her Functional Movement Screen in her winter gear:

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Sharika competes in the 100m hurdles, arguably the most competitive event in American track and field. At last year’s Olympic trials, she finished fourth, just missing the team. But Sharika and D2 are focused on 2017, not the past. On this assessment she looks great, moves well and is ready to put in the work to compete. We often tell athletes that when they look good on the movement assessment that it’s the time to work. Be comfortable trying something new. Let the body that moves well adapt to something new and see how it impacts performance.

This trip was pretty unique as we took the roadshow to multiple cities and had the privilege of seeing athletes from multiple disciplines. We started in Texas and Los Angeles with sprinters and hurdlers, moved to Reno to see the pole vaulters, onto Chula Vista at the Olympic Training Center for throwers and jumpers, finally ending in Orlando with Lance Brauman and his group of sprinters.

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Please seek out the athletes we saw on this last trip via their social media and show them your support as they attack 2017 with their focus on competing in the many events leading up to the World Championships in London August 3-13.

Sharika NelvisMookie SalaamDiondre BatsonBryce RobinsonAshley Spencer

Morolake AkinosunCourtney Ovolo | Brianna RollinsDalilah MuhammadNia Ali

Dawn HarperCale SimmonsJacob BlankenshipKatie NageotteLogan Cunningham

Kylie HutsonSandi MorrisMary SaxerMike Arnold | Dani BunchJarvis Gotch

Amanda BingsonDeanna PriceMaggie Malone | Curtis Thompson | Felisha Johnson

Amber CampbellAndrea GuebelleMichelle CarterKelsey CardOctavious Freeman

Noah LylesJosephus Lyles

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How Much Protein Do You Need?

Walk down almost any isle in the grocery store and you’ll see bold or italic letters on products with a common word: protein. Products want you to know that their stuff has more of it now, whether it’s 10 grams, 12 grams, or 20 grams per serving. So, how much do you actually need? Before that question is answered, let’s talk about the benefits of protein.

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Why You Need It

Protein not only produces energy, but it builds and maintains muscle mass as well. Getting adequate protein on a daily basis is a must if you’re trying to build muscle or actively trying to burn fat. Protein also reduces the excess carbohydrates that we take in with processed foods. Protein packs a punch, so make sure you’re getting enough.

How Much You Need

As great as protein is, your body can only absorb a certain amount for proper use. The maximum amount of protein you can consume daily is around one gram per pound of body weight. If you weigh 160 pounds, that’s 160 grams per day.

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The best way to consume protein is in smaller, more frequent ways throughout your day. Getting 20-40 grams five or six times during your day is better than gorging yourself for dinner. In fact, breakfast and bedtime are crucial times to get protein in your system. Whether it’s a shake or snack, lean protein in the morning and before bed go a long way in building and maintaining muscle mass.

 

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SVSP Strength and Conditioning Coaches

Have you met our strength and conditioning staff? Our coaches have the experience and expertise to take your performance to the next level. Wherever you are in your journey, they will help you maximize your potential on the field of play. Our coaches give you the same tools and attention that professional athletes receive. What are you waiting for?

Brandon Johnson

 

Greg Moore

 

Jaime Waymouth

 

Emily Burgess

 

David Williams

 

Stephanie Young

 

Jeff Richter

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The Thrill of the Victory and the Agony of Defeat

I’m sure that many of you can recall watching the introduction to ABC’s The Wild World of Sports and hearing Jim McKay say,” The thrill of victory and the agony of defeat”. This past week I had the privilege of working with a number of USA Track and Field athletes as they pursued their dream of making this year’s Olympic Team.

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I saw the thrill of victory when the world’s best times were posted by LaShawn Merritt and English Gardner. I witnessed the thrill of seeing Trayvon Bromell, Sandi Morris, Emily Infeld and Colleen Quigley overcome injury to make the Olympic Team.

I saw the agony of defeat when Molly Ludlow, Leah O’Connor and Georganne Moline had to deal with circumstances out of there control and were unable to make the team. Everyone felt an overwhelming sense of sadness and gratitude when track and field icons Sanya Richards Ross, Dee Dee Trotter and Adam Nelson failed to make the Olympic Team and announced their retirement. We will always remember their influences in the sport we love.

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Americans love watching and participating in sports for the thrill we get when we are victorious. We keep coming back when we experience the agony of defeat. I feel very honored and blessed to assist athletes as they strive to reach their goals and feel the thrill of their accomplishments.

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Extreme Sports

Track and field isn’t an extreme sport like base jumping, kite boarding or mountain climbing. This week, however, I was in a world of extremes.

In one week I went from Florida heat that reached 105 degrees, to Park City Utah, where we ran in long sleeves and 49 degree temperatures. From sea level to an altitude of 7000 feet. From sprinters to distance runners.

The common theme amongst these athletes is that they push their bodies to extremes. They all push themselves continuously in the pursuit of athletic performance. Sprinters are always on the verge of tearing their bodies up as they explode out of the blocks and go as hard as they can. All this physicality for an opportunity to compete again later in the day or a few days later in the finals. The distance runners log hours of running in a week. They vary the intensity of workouts, trying to maximize their strength with every repetitive step. These athletes ask their bodies to tolerate 60, 80 or even 100 miles per week in preparation for races measured in minutes.

Emily Infeld and Shelby Houlihan doing repeat 400s on the track at the University of Utah

Emily Infeld and Shelby Houlihan doing repeat 400s on the track at the University of Utah

This is the end of my season and the most important part of theirs. I am finished helping them get ready for the USA Olympic Trials in early July. They are about to embark on the most important races of the year. If they can make the USA Track and Field team in July, they have the opportunity to compete for an Olympic medal in early August. I do my job in relative anonymity, they do their job on a world stage for all to see.

When people ask what I do for a living it can be hard to describe. It’s easy to say that I’m a physician and leave it at that, but caring for athletes is what I do. It’s what I love to do. My job is not just seeing athletes when they are injured or ill but trying to help them maintain their health in the pursuit of performance.

Members of the Bowerman Track team do a work out on the track at the University of Utah Matt Hughes (Canada), Mo Ahmed (Canada), Chris Derrick, Ryan Hill, Evan Jager, Lopez Lomong, Andy Bayer, Dan Huling, German Fernandez

Members of the Bowerman Track team do a work out on the track at the University of Utah
Matt Hughes (Canada), Mo Ahmed (Canada), Chris Derrick, Ryan Hill, Evan Jager, Lopez Lomong, Andy Bayer, Dan Huling, German Fernandez

I am blessed to work with some of the greatest athletes in the world. When I see them and especially when I leave I always wish them the best and tell them that I will be watching. Please follow them, reach out to them and tell them you will be watching, too.

 

From Florida this past week

Candyce McGrone | Alexis Love | Isiah Young | Justin Walker | Jeff Demps |

Kaylin Whitney | Justin Gatlin

 

From Utah representing the Bowerman Track Club

Emily Infeld | Colleen Quigley | Shelby Houlihan | Chris Derrick | Andy Bayer

German Fernandez | Ryan Hill | Evan Jager | Dan Huling | Lopez Lomong

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[Free] Running Education Series

Prepping for the Mini Marathon or another race this spring? Looking to learn more about running? SVSP is offering a FREE Running Education Series. Beginning January 13, the eight week series will cover all aspects of running from the physical to mental.

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Our Licensed Athletic Trainers and doctors will discuss how to avoid knee and hip pain and reduce your risk for stress fractures. Sports dietitians will share tips for proper meal planning and the importance of good nutrition. A sport & performance psychologist, and avid runner, offers advice on mental toughness and training your brain for a good race. Plus, you’ll get to try an AlterG Treadmill and zip into Normatec Recovery boots.

It’s all free and located locally at St. Vincent Hospital in Carmel. Register now!

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Fuel your Body for a Marathon

It’s Marathon Season in Indiana. The Carmel Marathon, Mini-Marathon and Geist Half are all coming up in the next several weeks. We’ve talked about caring for your body as you train for a distance race before. This blog will focus on fueling your body before, during and after the big race.

 

Lindsay Langford, MS, RD, CSSD, sports dietician at St.Vincent Sports Performance has plenty of tips on on how you can eat to excel.

 

Day Before the Race

The morning before your race day, try eating a meal similar to what you want to eat race morning. This helps your body get used to the meal and you’re not shocking your body by feeding it something new before the race. Breakfast should be composed of mostly carbohydrates with a little protein. Some options include bagels with peanut butter or fruit with some yogurt.

 

Carbo-loading can be a good way to retain energy during the race. However, make sure you don’t exceed your normal caloric intake. The key is replacing some of your proteins and fat with carbohydrates, not adding mounds of pasta and bread on top of your regular meals. For marathons, you can start carbo-loading a couple of days before the race. The traditional spaghetti dinner the night before the race is still a great idea! Sub sandwiches, baked potatoes or sweet potatoes are also good options.

 

Race Day

Breakfast/Pre-Race – You’ll want to eat breakfast two to three hours before the race and and wash it down with 20 oz of fluid. Just like the day prior, start your day with something carb-heavy with a small amount of protein. Other options besides the ones listed above are bagels with eggs or a bowl of oatmeal. If you’re running in a busy race (with lots of other runners) and you need to get in a corral early, grab a sports drink or a gel to have 20-30 minutes before your start time.

 

Race – During the race, you’ll lose a lot of water through sweat, so make sure you hydrate early and often. Drink 6-12 oz of fluid every 15-20 minutes. Try swinging by the water stations every mile to regularly get a few ounces of liquid in your body. Starting at the 30-minute mark, consume 30-60 mg of carbohydrates (one to two gels or three to six gummies/blocks) every hour.

 

After the Race – Once you’ve crossed the finish line – congratulations, by the way! – your focus is replacing the fluids you lost during the race. You can lose from two to five lbs during a marathon or from one to four during a half-marathon. For each pound you lost, drink 16-24 oz of fluid. If it’s an especially hot race, or you’re a heavy sweater, you probably lost more weight and need to re-hydrate properly. Grab a banana or another protein snack on your way back to the car. Your next meal should be protein and carbohydrate heavy, like a sub sandwich or a protein shake and chicken.

 

Learn more about Lindsay and SVSP’s Performance Nutrition here. If you fuel your body right, it will reward you during the race!

 

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PowerBooster Training at SVSP

Power Booster LogoIf many of you look outside your window, going for a bike ride doesn’t seem like it would be an enjoyable experience. But thanks to Marian University Cycling and St.Vincent Sports Performance, bikers can participate in intense training year-round.

 

PowerBoosters is a high-tech indoor riding and coaching program put on by Marian University Cycling for the Indianapolis community, founded by Marian’s head cycling coach Dean Peterson. The advanced indoor multi-rider set-up allows the riders and coach to monitor, via digital screens, individual power (wattage), speed, distance ridden, caloric expenditure, and other metrics.

 

“The system is designed to simulate road experiences with your own bike – wind, weight draft, road conditions,” says Peterson. “These small group training sessions allow us to systemically train riders into the race season during the winter months.”

 

Deemed the “wattage cottage,” Marian’s PowerBooster classes are currently taking place and open to new riders at SVSP – Clay Terrace.

 

 

PowerBoosters isn’t just for competitive bikers and triathletes. Casual bike riders that enjoy riding around their neighborhood during the summer can still get the fitness benefits of bike riding. Riders are able to train with an individualized training program that caters to their fitness level and overall goals.

Wattage Cottage

 

A new six-week build up class starts soon at St.Vincent Sports Performance. Visit the PowerBoosters website for class information, FAQ’s and to sign up.

 

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