St. Vincent Sports Performance Names Nick Inzerello Director of Sports Performance

INDIANAPOLIS (July 17, 2017) – St. Vincent Sports Performance, one of the country’s leading sports performance centers for Olympians, professional athletes and everyday athletes, has named Nick Inzerello as Director of Sports Performance.

Inzerello will lead day-to-day internal operations and help SVSP continue to provide an exceptional customer experience. He will oversee areas including rehab, sport psychology, nutrition, certified athletic trainers and high performance coaches.  

For the past 14 years, Inzerello has worked for USA Football in various roles, most recently spending more than five years as senior director of partnerships and education. During his tenure at USA Football, he served as a member of its leadership team and helped build the organization into football’s National Governing Body.

“Nick’s experiences across the sports landscape has shaped his operations portfolio,” SVSP Executive Director Ralph Reiff said. “Nick demonstrated an acumen for health care in his leadership of USA Football’s Heads Up Football program, which revolutionized American football.”

A player safety initiative developed by Inzerello, Heads Up Football has been adopted by more than 7,600 organizations impacting 1.2 million youth and high school players. The program certifies 140,000 youth and high school coaches each year.

Prior to joining USA Football, Inzerello oversaw athlete marketing for the United States Olympic Committee and worked as a member of the USOC delegation at two Olympic Games (Sydney in 2000 and Salt Lake City in 2002).

Inzerello played football at Northwest Missouri State and graduated in 1998 with a bachelor’s degree in communications and media studies. He received his masters of business administration from Ohio University in 2016.

 

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The Work Isn’t Over When You Leave the Gym

It’s a great feeling walking out of the gym after a hard workout. You feel tired but also a sense of accomplishment and pride. But if the hard work ends as you exit, you’re not maximizing your fitness plan. The work on the field or in the gym is important, but recovering from that work is equally as important.

The prime time to start recovering is within 30 minutes of your workout. Your muscles are strained and tired, so refueling them right away is important. Focus on food and drinks that have high protein and plenty of carbohydrates to replace the glycogen stores (fancy word for energy) that you lost. These types of recovery snacks help you replace energy levels, repair muscle damage and rebuild muscles, making them stronger for the next time.

There are plenty of tasty options that accomplish this. A protein shake after your workout is a great way to get lots of protein into your system quickly. Chocolate milk is another excellent option for quick recovery. String cheese with pretzels offer good sodium as well, which helps prevent cramping. Apples or bananas with peanut butter also have a good protein/carb balance. Your first meal post-workout should also have plenty of healthy proteins and carbs. Avoid fast or junk food after a workout, as they offer little recovery benefits.

The work doesn’t stop after you’ve finished your last mile or cranked out your last rep. Plan ahead, have your recovery snack ready and reap the benefits of your hard work.

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On The Road With USA Football Pt. 2

After arriving at Trinity Western University in Langley, British Columbia, Canada last Thursday, this past week has been a whirlwind.  The first step was to unload all of our supplies and get the new “training room” set up.  This in itself is no small feat, as football requires much more athletic training supplies than nearly any other sport.  While a dorm room doesn’t make an ideal training room, Sarah and I have been able to transform it into a functional space to tape and treat, and have done a lot of both!

When it was announced that this tournament was going to be held in Canada, I thought we wouldn’t have to deal with any heat issues.  The average high for Langley this time of year is 71 degrees.  Of course, we experienced a heat wave of record highs, and temperatures on game day soared to around 90 degrees.  Thankfully, the ladies did a great job of hydrating and taking our advice leading up to the game and we were able to come away without any issues.  After a bit of a slow start, we were able to get things clicking and came out with a 29-0 victory over a very athletic Mexico team.

After two busy days of practice, treatments and recovery time, team Finland was next.  Thankfully, the heat wave broke and temperatures were back to normal.  With the nervousness of the first game behind them, the ladies came out and played well, securing a 48-0 win.  The victory puts us in the Gold Medal Game against our biggest rival and Tournament host, Canada.

Already you can feel a new tension in the air as we prepare for the championship game.  Team Canada has played well in their wins over Australia and Great Britain.  Sarah and I are doing our best to keep the training room light and relaxed, giving the players a refuge from the tension of meetings and practice.  Thankfully, injuries have been minimal.  Only one player was held from practice today.  Treatments have consisted mainly of massage, stretching, cupping, and everyone’s favorite, the ice tubs.  Our little courtyard at the dorm has a fire pit, which has made a nice addition to evening ice baths, and made for some good team bonding time.  It’s funny how each of these trips take on their own personality.

Friday evening we will have the opportunity to accomplish our goal of bringing home the Gold.  The coaches will put together a great game plan, Sarah and I will continue to do everything we can to help the ladies compete at their highest level, and I’m sure they will leave everything they have out on the field.  Hopefully it will be enough.

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Life in Color

You could call fruits and vegetables the superheroes of the food world. They fight off that pesky extra weight and protect our immune system and bone health. Fruits and veggies are high in both water and fiber and help cleanse the body of unwanted cholesterol. It also turns out that each color of fruits and vegetables have distinct benefits to the body. So when building your next plate, try to integrate as many colors of the rainbow as possible:

Reds are great for heart health, which is easy to remember. Tomatoes, apples, and watermelons are great examples. 

Oranges and Yellows support the immune system and also help eye health. Some examples are oranges, carrots and bananas.

Greens help prevent cancer and improve bone health. Eat some spinach, kale, kiwis and avocados.

Blues and Purples offer antioxidants that help with memory function and disease prevention. Examples include blueberries, grapes and blackberries.

 

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SVSP Back on the Road With USA Football

Each summer one of USA Football’s national teams participates in the International Federation of American Football (IFAF) World Championships and each year St. Vincent Sports Performance is right there providing premier medical support along the way.  Last year, Chad Gabbard and I traveled to Harbin, China, with the U19 national team. This year, it’s the women’s national team on their quest for gold.

Sarah Luken and myself have spent the past week at Pacific Lutheran University in Tacoma, Washington, working with the team through training camp.  As it is every year, it’s been amazing to watch how quickly individuals from all over the country come together as a team in such a short time.  In my opinion, football is the ultimate team sport, and with the bond this team has forged so quickly, the U.S. is well on their way to another solid performance.

This squad of 45 women represent 15 different states, and ranges in age from 21 to 47 years old.  One thing that makes working with the women’s national team a bit more challenging is the fact that nearly all of the players have just finished up their regular season back home or are in the middle of their playoffs.  In fact, about half of the team reported to camp the day after they just played a game.  This adds to an already delicate balance of getting in the practice time we need, along with making sure they have time to rest and recover before we head to Canada and play three games in eight days.

Needless to say, the training room has been a popular place.  When not on the field, in meetings, or at meals, chances are you’ll find Luken and I in there doing everything we can to help these ladies stay healthy and able to perform their best.

Today is our last day of camp.  We’ll finish with an “ice tub party,” get all our supplies packed back up, and get ready to head north of the border tomorrow morning.  Saturday afternoon we open up against Mexico.

Stay tuned.

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Want more energy? Do this

Busy schedules that include work, kids, appointments, workouts and much more can seem to zap energy right out of us. So what is the key to starting your day off with an adequate amount of energy? Look no further than the most important meal of the day.

After a good night’s sleep (equally as important to having energy) you lose glycogen levels. In fact, you normally wake up with a level around 40-60%. Glycogen equates to energy, so in essence you only have half the energy you normally do after waking up. Eating breakfast is extremely important; here’s how to make sure it’ll work.

Carbohydrates

The first ingredient you’ll want in your breakfast is carbs. Carbs are quick-burning, giving you an immediate boost. Items such as oatmeal, whole grain waffles or cereal and English muffins or whole wheat toast will give you that quick energy boost. Don’t neglect carbs when it comes to starting your day.

Protein

To compliment the carbs in your breakfast, you’ll want to pack some protein in there as well. Unlike carbs, proteins are slow-burning and give you lasting energy throughout most of the day. Without protein, your breakfast energy won’t last long. Grab some nuts, make some eggs and eat some Greek yogurt or peanut butter to get the protein you’ll need.

 

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Three Creative Ways to Stay Hydrated

Summer, at long last, it here. And with it come a plethora of outdoor activities that weren’t able to be enjoyed in the winter months. One key to enjoying a safe and active summer is hydration. Our muscles are composed of roughly 75% water, and depriving them of fluids can be detrimental to performance. So whether you’re an athlete in the midst of training or someone who simply enjoys the outdoors, here are three creative tips to ensure you’re drinking enough:

Carry a Bottle With Ounces Labeled: 

A good indication of how much you should be drinking on a daily basis is to divide your body weight in half and convert that number to ounces. Seem like a lot? That’s because it is. That’s what your body needs daily to be at its best. Carrying a water bottle with the ounces labeled on the outside is an easy way to see exactly how much you’re drinking and can help you keep the proper pace.

Try Flavoring Drops and Packets: 

There are plenty of these products on the market, and most of them are extremely low in calories and sugar. Adding flavor to your water is a great way to make hydration easier, plus you can mix up flavors to ensure you never get bored with the taste.

Infuse Your Water With Fruits or Herbs: 

Adding natural ingredients to water can give it a splash of flavor. Citrus, like oranges, limes and lemons work well. You can also try cucumbers or some mint leaves to add refreshment. All of these add a healthy punch to your water and make it more enjoyable to drink.

Hydrating doesn’t have to be boring or become redundant. Add new flavors, track your intake and enjoy those summer activities with a full tank of water in your system.

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Mental Prep: Gain the Edge Before You Compete

Spending hours on the field and in the gym are certainly going to help you improve, but one of the most neglected areas of training is the mind. So before you step into the arena, spend some time preparing away from practice. Here are two areas to focus on:

Composure

“Butterflies” really do exist for everyone and are completely normal. What’s important is how you manage them. Physical strategies such as relaxation or deep breathing techniques can work, as well as mental ones like self-talk, an inner dialogue to remain positive and confident.

The way we think, feel and speak to ourselves is impactful on our performance. Be aware of your own inner dialogue and use statements that are confidence-builders.

  • “I am prepared.”
  • “I am knowledgeable.”

Avoid statements that add pressure or lead to worries about the outcome.

  • “I have to nail this!”
  • “If I don’t do well, then…”

The key to composure is to keep your thoughts focused on the present and what is within your control.

Visualization

Confidence does not come from the absence of pressure or adversity, but rather knowing you have the tools to perform well despite these challenges. Your confidence level stems from a variety of sources – past performance, preparation, goal achievement, feedback from others, and self-talk.

Another chief confidence-building tool is visualization.

Just as a driver in the Indy 500 will imagine the opening laps of the race before their ignition is even fired or a quarterback imagines the routes the receiver will run before the ball is snapped, you, too, can visualize the scenarios in which you will perform.

Imagine yourself performing calmly, assuredly and successfully. What does your goal look like? Visualize yourself performing in a way that achieves it. Highlight what you did to make that happen.

Most importantly, have a plan for how you will practice and implement these skills!

Your perspective ultimately determines how you “perform.” When the pressure is on, mastering these skills will allow you to be better composed and more confident, which will set-up the success that follows.

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2017 Summer Training Schedule

Register today for any of these programs and make 2017 the best summer ever with SVSP!

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How do I Stop a Plateau?

It is one of the most frustrating things in the world to feel as if you are stuck at a certain point in athletics; when you can’t improve upon a race time, your vertical jump height doesn’t increase, or you’re not able to add more weight to your back squat.  This phenomenon is commonly referred to as a plateau, and a suggestion that has frequently surfaced to remedy the situation is a “never-do-the-same-workout-twice” strategy.  This strategy, often called “muscle confusion,” involves doing many different types of training to keep your body guessing and “confuse” your muscles into continued growth.  What people who follow this type of training often fail to realize is that our muscles receive orders from the brain and are not independent structures that become bored and stop producing results after a few weeks.  We have to be smart with our training, the stressors on our body, and the stimuli that we send to our muscles.  If we are constantly switching things up in a weight training program, our bodies will not have time to adapt and improve.  So, how do we prevent a decline in performance?  How long should we actually be performing exercises before we switch things up?  If you have ever wondered about plateaus, here are a few ways to make sure that you are maximizing your training and seeing results consistently over time.

Work with a Certified Strength & Conditioning Coach

One of the biggest benefits of a proper strength & conditioning facility is that you have a coach who programs based on your individual needs.  This should involve periodized strength & conditioning programming that involves a build without plateau, peaks for when you need them, and monitoring/adjustment of programming as needed.  Knowing which exercises to perform, how many sets and reps you should do, and how often these variables should change is extremely important in training.  Because of the importance and complexity involved in strength & conditioning programming, having a qualified professional to guide you is imperative to long-term athletic success.

Become great at the basics

You do not need as much variety in training as you think.  If you consider how you train in sport, it involves repeating the important skills over and over again in practice to perfect your technique.   To a certain extent, this same concept needs to be applied in strength training.  Your body must learn to efficiently and safely move through basic movement patterns: squat, lunge, hinge, push, pull, and rotate.  There are many different variations of exercises that fall into these basic categories, but it is important to master the basics and allow adaptations to occur before progressing to a more complex version of an exercise.  You need a solid foundation for sport, and your exercises in the weight room should be selected based on function and usefulness to you as an individual, and not on the complexity or attractiveness of the movement.

Protect your body from injury

Training should be pain-free and should include movements that help protect against future injury.   This includes: performing a warm-up that will prepare you for movement and is specific to your movement deficiencies, including soft-tissue work into your daily routine, ensuring that areas of the body that are supposed to be mobile are, ensuring that areas of the body that are supposed to be stabile are, etc.  Your Certified Strength & Conditioning Coach will help you identify where the “leaks” in your system are and prescribe movement patterns that will increase your efficiency as an athlete and prepare you for the demands of life and sport.  Preparedness is the key to injury prevention!

Train as an individual

Not everyone should be doing the same warm-up or strength training exercises, just like not every athlete will need to work on the same sport skill for the same amount of time as everyone else on the team.  Your body is unique, your training needs are different, and what works for someone else will not necessarily work for you.  For these reasons, it is important to listen to your body, perform the exercises that work for your anatomy and training needs, and learn what works to make YOU better.  The movements you perform do not need to rigidly follow a universal model of training or even be “sport-specific.”  They must be specific to you and need to be intentionally placed within your programming.  Within the confines of energy, time, etc., it is important to be intentional with training to optimize opportunity for improvement.

Rest, eat properly, and hydrate

Maximizing your athletic potential involves making smart decisions both on and off the field/court/etc.  You need to make sure that you’re drinking enough water, fueling your body with the proper nutrition, and sleeping/resting enough.  While some may struggle with consistency and drive, others find themselves losing momentum because they are doing too much.  Non-stop training, or training that isn’t done well, will eventually wear on you regardless of how accomplished you feel.  Not only will you feel the physical effects of overtraining, but the mental effects as well.  It is important to establish healthy habits early to set yourself up for success.  The sooner you start, the sooner you will be able to reap the benefits.

In conclusion, “muscle confusion,” is not the answer to avoiding plateau.  It is possible for your improvement to waver, but it is NOT possible to confuse your muscles into avoiding the drop.  Your body will need to slow down or stop during your athletic career, but there are steps you can take to manage your health and prevent a decline in performance.  Focus on the things that you can control and reach out to qualified professionals for the answers that you don’t have.  Have you experienced a plateau before?  Are you wondering what you can do to try to prevent one?  Contact us and let us know how we can help!

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